Achieve Teacher and Administrator Grants

The Achieve Foundation offers a number of opportunities for educators in the School District of South Orange and Maplewood. Our collaboration with teachers and administrators informs our program development and fundraising, so we can best serve our mission of maximizing education for all students and staff members. Educators may apply for funding for a project, equipment or professional development or request a tutor for a struggling student. We need teachers to lead training sessions for volunteer tutors, to participate in Achieve events such as Maker Madness and to join committees. Achieve welcomes your ideas!

Achieve’s grant applications are easy to complete, and help and advice are available upon request. All proposals must be approved by the applicant’s principal or supervisor, and they must be submitted by the deadline to be considered for funding. Educators may apply for Achieve grants as often as they wish, but evaluations of prior grant must be submitted, in order for new applications to be considered.

Teacher Grants

Achieve’s hallmark Teacher Grant program inspires district teachers to propose new, innovative projects that will add to the learning experience for their students. Any educator in the district may apply in mid-October. Team and interdisciplinary projects are welcome. Proposals are reviewed by Achieve’s grants committee, and awards are made in early December to be used in the spring or the following fall.

In some cases, successful Teacher Grant projects influence the school district to fund new academic programs. The award of a grant for the high school Robotics Club led to a highly popular, competitive program and served as a catalyst for the establishment of a robotics curriculum.

COMPLETE LIST OF 2016-17 GRANTS

After Achieve disburses its annual allocation of funds for Teacher Grant awards, the community is invited to increase that amount through DIRECT GRANT FUNDING. Donors choose from the list of approved grants that need additional funding and contribute toward them in any amount. In 2015-16, Direct Grant Funding added $25,900 to the total amount of grant funding.

GRANTS AVAILABLE FOR DIRECT FUNDING

DONATE TO DIRECT FUNDING

The Teacher Grant program also receives support from Achieve’s spring HONOR YOUR TEACHER campaign, which allows families to order cards, printed with their children’s words of thanks to any staff member at any school at the end of the school year (or any time of year).

ORDER A TRIBUTE

Thanks to the help of generous contributions from the community, Achieve grants have boosted technology, modernized science labs, added musical instruments, created school gardens and “maker spaces,” fostered character-building and much more.

Administrator Grants

Achieve awards grants to district administrators for special projects that enhance the educational program of a school, grade level or department. Grants may be used for staff development, student enrichment or remediation and educational materials. Administrators may apply in February for a late March or early April deadline.

PREVIOUSLY AWARDED ADMINISTRATOR GRANTS

2015 Charles Ezell, CHS assistant principal: Facilitators for Columbia 2025

2015 Kevin Mason, Tuscan Elementary School assistant principal: Robotics Club

2014 Bonita Samuels, Marshall Elementary School principal: “Smart” Classroom

2013 Jeff Truppo, Maplewood Middle School principal: SOMSD’s First One-to-One Team

2012 Faye Lewis, Columbia High School assistant principal: MAC Scholars Summer Enrichment Academy

2012 Judy LoBianco, district supervisor of health, physical education and nursing services: Linking Physical Education Curriculum to Assessment

2011 Paul Roth, district chief information officer: Algebra IPad Project for Bridge to Success

2011 Kimberly Beane, district supervisor of K-5 math and science: Singapore Math Strategies Conference

2010 Judith Hanratty, district supervisor of English language arts: Teachers College July Writing Institute

2009 Michael Healy, Columbia High School assistant principal: Bridge to Success

2009 Gary Pankiewicz, district supervisor of English language arts: Student-Centered Summer Reading

2008 Maryrose Caulfield-Sloan, Jefferson Elementary School principal: Grade 3 Multi-Modal Learning Center

2008 Thomas Gibbons South Mountain School principal: Reading Support Software Training

2008 Patricia O’Neill, Clinton Elementary School principal: Principal’s Center for Educational Leadership Seminar

2006 Janice McGowan, Columbia High School assistant principal: AVID Conference for Administrators

2005 Kristopher Harrison, Maplewood Middle School principal: Middle School Team Renewal

2004 Renee Pollack, Columbia High School principal: Bridge to Success

Teacher and Administrator Grants

APPLY

Already received a grant? Complete the project evaluation form.

GRANT EVALUATION

Already received a fellowship? Complete the project evaluation form.

RIECKE FELLOWSHIP EVALUATION

Questions About Our Grants?

CONTACT US

2015-2016 Awards

VIEW LIST

administrator grant statistics-16

teacher grant statistics-16

Riecke fellowship grant statistics-16

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Guidelines and Criteria for Achieve Foundation Teacher Grants

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Guidelines and Criteria for Achieve Foundation Teacher Grants

All projects must:

  1. Identify a clear educational objective, need or gap
  2. Support overall district goals
  3. Provide a timetable, needed materials and process for completion
  4. Include an assessment plan that will demonstrate projected outcome(s) and impact
  5. Include an itemized, verifiable budget
  6. Be reviewed, approved and signed by the teacher’s principal or supervisor to insure the feasibility of the intended project
  7. Support the advancement of current offerings or equipment for which the district insures future oversight and maintenance
  8. Be completed by submitting the required evaluation and expense report at the end of the project
Read the Complete PDF
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10 Tips for Writing a Successful Achieve Foundation Grant Application

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10 Tips for Writing a Successful Achieve Foundation Grant Application

See the tips below to find out what you can do to improve your chances of getting the funds you request.

1. SUBMIT A CREATIVE AND INNOVATIVE PROPOSAL.

2. MAKE SURE THE PROJECT’S OBJECTIVES AND TIMELINE ARE ACHIEVABLE.

3. THE MORE STUDENTS WHO BENEFIT, THE BETTER.

4. COMPLETE FULLY ALL STEPS IN THE GRANT APPLICATION.

5. SELECT A DESCRIPTIVE PROJECT TITLE AND WRITE A SUCCINCT SUMMARY.

6. MAKE IT EASY TO READ YOUR APPLICATION.

7. CONSIDER YOUR PROJECT’S SUSTAINABILITY.

8. PROJECT YOUR COSTS CAREFULLY.

9. OUTCOMES ARE VERY IMPORTANT.

10.THE ONLY WAY TO RECEIVE A GRANT IS TO APPLY!

Read the Complete PDF
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Tips on Creating an Itemized Budget Teacher Grant Application

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Tips on Creating an Itemized Budget Teacher Grant Application

The tips below will help you put together a budget that accurately reflects not only how much the program will cost but also how it will be managed.

1. MAKE SURE ALL EXPENDITURES ARE ALLOWED.

2. CONSIDER ALL EXPENDITURES.

3. PROVIDE A REASONABLE AMOUNT OF DETAIL.

4. RESEARCH COSTS AND CONSIDER FUTURE COSTS.

5. MAKE SURE THE NUMBERS ADD UP.

Read the Complete PDF

Summer Professional Development –
Riecke Teaching Fellowship

 

Michelle T. Riecke believed that teachers are our schools’ greatest asset and are key to maximizing student achievement. Shelley was an active community volunteer who served on the SO/M school board for six years, including a two-year term as board president. Following her death in 2003, her family and friends created an endowed fellowship program in her memory and entrusted it to the Achieve Foundation.

The Riecke Fellowship program makes awards to educators in the SO/M school district who seek to advance their teaching abilities over the summer by acquiring new knowledge and skills to use in traditional classroom settings and beyond. Riecke Fellows begin the school year with new skills that lead to improvements in practice, curriculum and ultimately student achievement. At the conclusion of the fellowship,, Riecke Fellows share what they have learned with their colleagues. The program has provided over $50,000 in fellowships since 2004.

The fellowship:

  • Instills educators with a passion to teach, using innovative and creative teaching practices in the classroom setting and beyond.
  • Leads to the exchange of new ideas, strategies and materials among educators so that knowledge gained will benefit students throughout the district.

Fellowships are awarded to individuals (up to $3,000) and teaching teams (up to $5,000). The number of grants and total amount awarded is determined each year based on the merits of the proposals and the availability of funds. The application is available in February with a late March or early April deadline.

 

PREVIOUS FELLOWS

2015: James Cotter, College Board AP Annual Conference in Austin, Texas

2015: Lynn McGlotten and Liz Harris, MathCamp: Integrating the Common Core Shifts Into Math Instruction in New York, N.Y.

2015: Bebe Greenberg and Donna Grohman, Summer Institute at the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project in New York

2014: Victoria Schodowski, Universal Design for Learning, Center for Applied Special Technology in Wakefield, Mass.

2014: Debra Cecacci, Elizabeth Frascella, Susan Froelich and Mary Leocata, Authentic Feedback with Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education, in Hopewell, N.J.

2013: Arlene Aguirre and Katherine Fearon: Center for Applied Linguistics’ What’s Different About Teaching Reading to Students Learning English as ELL’s in Washington, D.C.

2013: Mark Richman, College Board AP Summer Institute in Statistics at Middlesex Community College in New Jersey

2012: Mark Harley and Heidi Welner, NASA’s Johnson Space Center Clouds Zero Gravity Program in Houston, Texas (program later postponed by NASA)

2011: Ann Bodnar, Joseph Ferriero, Yolande Fleming, Shea Levin and Marian Power, NCTM Algebra Readiness for Every Student Institute in Baltimore, Md.

2010: Patricia O’Connell, Scholastic Read 180 National Summer Institute in Nashville, Tenn.

2010: Phillip Lester, National At-Risk Conference (March 6-9, 2011) in Savannah, Ga.

2009: Mary Brancaccio: Creative Non-Fiction: Telling the Truth at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y.

2009: Cathrine Evans, Maureen Davenport, Sue Donatelli, Kathy Shelffo and Lisa Heumann, Responsive Classroom Institute in New York, N.Y.

2008: Bebe Greenberg, Donna Grohman and Jennifer Smalletz, The August Institute on the Teaching of Writing at Columbia University, New York, N.Y.

2006: Peter Trebour and Thomas Whitaker, Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) Conference in San Diego, Calif.

2005: Noah Brauner, Computer-Aided Design Technology at New York School of Visual Arts in New York, N.Y.

2005: Kate Pfiefer, Counseling in Culturally Diverse Communities, Minuchin Center for the Family in New York, N.Y.

2004: Eve Kingsbury, Angela Medise and Valerie Sharp, National Differentiated Instruction Conference in Las Vegas, Nev.

 

The Riecke Fellowship

APPLY

Already received a fellowship? Complete the project evaluation form.

RIECKE FELLOWSHIP EVALUATION

Questions About Our Grants?

CONTACT US

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Achieve Volunteer Tutor Program

Achieve’s acclaimed tutoring program improves the academic performance of children who are struggling with their schoolwork, by pairing them with adult and peer volunteers. The initiative began in 1997, based on the notion that free tutoring, offered by trained volunteers, might help many children, who otherwise would not be able to afford this service, to advance toward their full academic potential.

District teachers refer students, who they believe would benefit from the help of a volunteer tutor. Each year, about 200 tutors — 50 adults and 150 students — are trained to assist 250-300 students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Achieve’s tutors help students overcome academic challenges and gain confidence. Moreover, the students who serve as Achieve tutors reinforce their own learning and develop leadership skills.

Achieve’s Volunteer Tutor Program coordinator manages the program and arranges tutor-tutee matches. Teachers in the school district lead required training workshops and supervise tutoring sites in district schools.


Testimonials

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“Achieve tutors and students make miracles happen together by reading one sentence at a time and solving one math problem at a time, week in and week out.”

Sonoko Setaishi, adult tutor in the Achieve Volunteer Tutor Program

“What makes me happy is that, no matter the party, I have received a flood of messages from guests and hosts saying how they truly had such a terrific evening.”

Lindsay Scott, 2014 coordinator of the annual Night of 100 Dinners fundraising event and member of the Achieve Board of Trustees

“This is one of very few courses that allow kids to build things, to become focused on the stuff of the modern world. Without Achieve, these students would not have this opportunity. You can see it—kids love being in this class and that is a lasting legacy of Achieve’s support.”

Allan Tumolillo, founder of the Robotics Club at Columbia High School that led to the addition of robotics classes at the high school, and a member of the Achieve Board of Trustees

“It’s heartwarming to see that even folks who no longer have kids in the district still have a deep commitment to the organization. I can’t imagine our district without the Achieve Foundation.”

Susan Grierson, assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction, School District of South Orange and Maplewood

“Yet again, Achieve has proven what a valuable organization it is to teachers and students alike.”

Susan Brody, fourth-grade teacher at Seth Boyden Elementary School and an Achieve Teacher Grant recipient

“There are these special moments, when working with young kids, when their faces suddenly light up, like something finally clicked.”

Zoë Crutcher, student tutor in the Achieve Volunteer Tutor Program